Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/43435
Title: When farmers are planting houses …
Authors: Ip, D 
Keywords: Food security
Planting houses
Rural demolition and relocation
Rural land acquisition and compensation
Rural urbanisation
Issue Date: 2015
Publisher: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group
Source: China journal of social work, 2015, v. 8, no. 3, p. 284-292 How to cite?
Journal: China journal of social work 
Abstract: This paper examines the reasons behind the continual growth of the phenomenon of famers ‘planting’ cheap and substandard houses on farmland in rural China repeatedly and without government permission. The practice has been commonly interpreted by local governments as schemes instigated by greedy farmers to maximise compensation payments from the government when their properties are requisitioned for public infrastructural or private development projects. Researchers however have found that such practices are measures farmers learnt from others to insure themselves against land grabs as well as inadequate compensation offered by local governments and developers. Their vulnerability however also spanned a growing illegal industry where farmers short of cash were lured into participating in organised ‘house planting’ projects although they could be caught and put in jail by local authorities. Other researchers are equally concerned by the threat of food security should these incidences continue to escalate. However, these problems would not be easily addressed because the survival of local governments has grown to be heavily dependent on both the huge revenues generated by and winning political mileage from urbanising the rural, or converting agricultural to non-agricultural lands.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/43435
ISSN: 1752-5098
EISSN: 1752-5101
DOI: 10.1080/17525098.2015.1082494
Appears in Collections:Journal/Magazine Article

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