Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/43170
Title: In vitro biocompatibility of hydroxyapatite-reinforced polymeric composites manufactured by selective laser sintering
Authors: Zhang, Y
Hao, L
Savalani, MM 
Harris, RA
Silvio, DI L
Tanner, K
Keywords: Biocompatibility
Composite
Hydroxyapatite
In vitro
Osteoblast cells
Polyethylene
Polyamide
Selective laser sintering
Issue Date: 2009
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Source: Journal of biomedical materials research. Part A, 2009, v. 91A, no. 4, p. 1018-1027 How to cite?
Journal: Journal of biomedical materials research. Part A 
Abstract: The selective laser sintering (SLS) technique was used to manufacture hydroxyapatite-reinforced polyethylene and polyamide composites as potential customized maxillofacial implants. In vitro tests were carried out to assess cellular responses, in terms of cell attachment, morphology, proliferation, differentiation, and mineralized nodule formation, using primary human osteoblast cells. This study showed that the SLS composite processed was biocompatible, with no adverse effects observed on cell viability and metabolic activity, supporting a normal metabolism and growth pattern for osteoblasts. Positive von Kossa staining demonstrated the presence of bone-like mineral on the SLS materials. Higher hydroxyapatite content composites enhanced cell proliferation, increased alkaline phosphatase activity, and produced more osteocalcin. The present findings showed that SLS materials have good in vitro biocompatibility and hence demonstrated biologically the potential of SLS for medical applications.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/43170
ISSN: 1549-3296
EISSN: 1552-4965
DOI: 10.1002/jbm.a.32298
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