Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/36047
Title: Numerical and experimental study on the effect of signal bandwidth on pipe assessment using fluid transients
Authors: Lee, PJ
Duan, HF 
Tuck, J
Ghidaoui, M
Keywords: Closed conduit
Frequency domain
One-dimensional model
Transient
Water pipelines
Issue Date: 2015
Publisher: American Society of Civil Engineers
Source: Journal of hydraulic engineering, 2015, v. 141, no. 2 How to cite?
Journal: Journal of hydraulic engineering 
Abstract: A non-intrusive fault detection technology for real time condition assessment of pipelines is highly desirable for pipeline operators and the use of artificially induced fluid transients for this purpose has been the topic of many studies in the past. Fluid transients are stress waves in the fluid that can propagate through pipelines at high speeds and can collect information on the pipe condition during its travel. Whilst many transient-based fault detection methods have been proposed in the literature, little work was done on the characteristics of the transient signal that is best suited for fault detection. Such a study is critical for the development of this technology as the generation of controlled pressure waves is a challenging key step of the procedure. This paper presents analytical, numerical and experimental results to illustrate the effect of signal bandwidth (frequency content) of the induced transient signals has on the spatial resolution, accuracy and range of transient based fault detection. The results demonstrate that higher bandwidth signals provide more accurate fault detection at the expense of detection range.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/36047
ISSN: 0733-9429 (print)
1943-7900 (online)
DOI: 10.1061/(ASCE)HY.1943-7900.0000961
Appears in Collections:Journal/Magazine Article

Access
View full-text via PolyU eLinks SFX Query
Show full item record

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

6
Last Week
0
Last month
Citations as of Apr 22, 2017

WEB OF SCIENCETM
Citations

6
Last Week
0
Last month
Citations as of Apr 26, 2017

Page view(s)

13
Last Week
0
Last month
Checked on Apr 23, 2017

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric



Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.