Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/35765
Title: Effect of balconies and upper-lower vents on ventilation and indoor air quality in a wind-induced, naturally ventilated building
Authors: Cui, DJ
Mak, CM 
Niu, JL 
Keywords: Balconies
Upper-lower vents
Ventilation
Indoor air quality
Buildings
Issue Date: 2014
Publisher: SAGE Publications
Source: Building services engineering research and technology, 2014, v. 35, no. 4, p. 393-407 How to cite?
Journal: Building services engineering research and technology 
Abstract: Balconies are green features commonly used in residential buildings to improve natural ventilation and air quality. Small vents, if mounted with an acoustic silencer, can reduce noise penetration while still allowing natural ventilation to occur. In this study, the computational fluid dynamics method is used to investigate numerically the effect of balconies with small upper and lower vents on the ventilation and air quality of the 4th, 5th and 6th floors of a 10-storey building. The results show that balconies can significantly increase the natural ventilation on these floors and generally have a more positive effect on the improvement of natural ventilation and the reduction in pollutant concentration on the floor on which they are located rather than on the levels above or below. Practical application: This study will help designers and engineers understand more about the effect of balconies and lower and upper vents on natural ventilation and indoor air quality in buildings. This study will also help them to incorporate with confidence the design of balconies with lower and upper vents.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/35765
ISSN: 0143-6244
DOI: 10.1177/0143624413499353
Appears in Collections:Journal/Magazine Article

Access
View full-text via PolyU eLinks SFX Query
Show full item record

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

2
Last Week
0
Last month
Citations as of May 21, 2017

WEB OF SCIENCETM
Citations

1
Last Week
0
Last month
Citations as of May 22, 2017

Page view(s)

23
Last Week
2
Last month
Checked on May 21, 2017

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric



Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.