Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/34966
Title: Effect of using prismatic eye lenses on the posture of patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis measured by 3‐D motion analysis
Authors: Wong, MS 
Mak, AFT
Luk, KDK
Evans, JH
Brown, B
Issue Date: 2002
Publisher: SAGE Publications
Source: Prosthetics and orthotics international, 2002, v. 26, no. 2, p. 139-153 How to cite?
Journal: Prosthetics and orthotics international 
Abstract: This is a preliminary investigation to detect the body sway and postural changes of patients with AIS under different spatial images. Two pairs of low‐power prismatic eye lenses (Fresnel prisms) with 5 dioptre and 10 dioptre were used. In the experiment, the apices of the prisms were orientated randomly at every 22.5° from 0° to 360° to test changes. Four patients with mean age of 11 and Cobb's angle of 30° were recruited and the results showed that the low‐power prisms at specific orientations (157.5° and 180°) could cause positive postural changes (2.1° ‐2.7° reduction of angle of trunk mis‐alignment) measured by 3‐D motion analysis. This might be used for controlling their scoliotic curves by induced visual bio‐feedback. Apart from this laboratory test, a longitudinal study is necessary to investigate the long‐term effect of the prisms at different powers and orientations (under both static and dynamic situations) on the patient's posture, spinal muscular activities, vision, eye‐hand coordination, psychological state and other daily activities before it becomes an alternative management of AIS.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/34966
ISSN: 0309-3646
EISSN: 1746-1553
DOI: 10.1080/03093640208726637
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