Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/34284
Title: Retardation of myopia in orthokeratology (ROMIO) study : a 2-year randomized clinical trial
Authors: Cho, P 
Cheung, SW
Issue Date: 2012
Publisher: Assoc Research Vision Ophthalmology Inc
Source: Investigative ophthalmology and visual science, 2012, v. 53, no. 11, p. 7077-7085 How to cite?
Journal: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science 
Abstract: Purpose. This single-masked randomized clinical trial aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of orthokeratology (ortho-k) for myopic control. Methods. A total of 102 eligible subjects, ranging in age from 6 to 10 years, with myopia between 0.50 and 4.00 diopters (D) and astigmatism not more than 1.25D, were randomly assigned to wear ortho-k lenses or single-vision glasses for a period of 2 years. Axial length was measured by intraocular lens calculation by a masked examiner and was performed at the baseline and every 6 months. This study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00962208. Results. In all, 78 subjects (37 in ortho-k group and 41 in control group) completed the study. The average axial elongation, at the end of 2 years, were 0.36 ± 0.24 and 0.63 ± 0.26 mm in the ortho-k and control groups, respectively, and were significantly slower in the ortho-k group (P < 0.01). Axial elongation was not correlated with the initial myopia (P > 0.54) but was correlated with the initial age of the subjects (P < 0.001). The percentages of subjects with fast myopic progression (>1.00D per year) were 65% and 13% in younger (age range: 7-8 years) and older (age range: 9-10 years) children, respectively, in the control group and were 20% and 9%, respectively, in the ortho-k group. Five subjects discontinued ortho-k treatment due to adverse events. Conclusions. On average, subjects wearing ortho-k lenses had a slower increase in axial elongation by 43% compared with that of subjects wearing single-vision glasses. Younger children tended to have faster axial elongation and may benefit from early ortho-k treatment.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/34284
DOI: 10.1167/iovs.12-10565
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