Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/34036
Title: The application of a sequence alignment method to the creation of typologies of tourist activity in time and space
Authors: Shoval, N
McKercher, B 
Birenboim, A
Ng, E
Keywords: Global positioning systems (GPS)
Hong Kong
Sequence alignment methods (SAM)
Tourist typologies
Issue Date: 2015
Publisher: Pion Limited
Source: Environment and planning B: Planning and design, 2015, v. 42, no. 1, p. 76-94 How to cite?
Journal: Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design 
Abstract: In this article we introduce the method of sequence alignment and its uses for creating tourist typologies based on temporal and spatial movements through a destination. The sequence alignment method was first developed in the 1980s by biochemists who wished to analyse DNA sequences; it was adapted for use in the social sciences towards the end of the 1990s. Unlike traditional quantitative methods, sequence alignment is concerned with the order (or sequence) of events. Thus, it is well suited for tourism research, as tourism involves the mobility of tourists through time and space. In this study, a database composed of 305 space-time sequences of visitors to Hong Kong was analysed. Data were obtained using global positioning system devices which were distributed among participants. The sequences were aligned using ClustalG, a sequence alignment computer program. The analysis resulted in the identification of various classifications of tourists in Hong Kong based on their time¡Vspace patterns.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/34036
ISSN: 0265-8135
DOI: 10.1068/b38065
Appears in Collections:Journal/Magazine Article

Access
View full-text via PolyU eLinks SFX Query
Show full item record

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

4
Last Week
0
Last month
0
Citations as of Sep 7, 2017

WEB OF SCIENCETM
Citations

6
Last Week
0
Last month
0
Citations as of Sep 16, 2017

Page view(s)

47
Last Week
2
Last month
Checked on Sep 18, 2017

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric



Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.