Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/33822
Title: Culture and accountability in negotiation : recognizing the importance of in-group relations
Authors: Liu, W 
Friedman, R
Hong, YY
Keywords: Accountability
Chinese
Culture
Fixed-pie perception
In-group
Negotiation
Relationship
Issue Date: 2012
Publisher: Academic Press Inc Elsevier Science
Source: Organizational behavior and human decision processes, 2012, v. 117, no. 1, p. 221-234 How to cite?
Journal: Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes 
Abstract: We extend Gelfand and Realo's (1999) argument that accountability motivates negotiators from relationally-focused cultures to use a more pro-relationship approach during negotiations. Our research shows that the effect they predict is found only when the other negotiating partner is an in-group member. Specifically, in two studies involving participants from China (a relationally-focused culture) and the US (a less relationally-focused culture), we found that only when negotiating with an in-group member are Chinese participants under high accountability more likely to use a pro-relationship approach than those under low accountability. Consequently, the differences between Chinese and American participants in the use of a pro-relationship approach occur only when they negotiate with an in-group member under high accountability. The strong attention to relationships, however, results in higher fixed-pie perceptions and lower joint gains. The implications of our findings for theory and practice are discussed.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/33822
DOI: 10.1016/j.obhdp.2011.11.001
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