Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/3331
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributorSchool of Nursing-
dc.creatorChan, EA-
dc.creatorChung, J-
dc.creatorWong, TKS-
dc.creatorLien, ASY-
dc.creatorYang, JY-
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-11T08:24:27Z-
dc.date.available2014-12-11T08:24:27Z-
dc.identifier.issn0962-1067-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10397/3331-
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen_US
dc.rights© 2007 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_US
dc.subjectNursesen_US
dc.subjectNursingen_US
dc.subjectPain and presenceen_US
dc.subjectPediatric burnen_US
dc.subjectVirtual realityen_US
dc.subjectWound careen_US
dc.titleApplication of a virtual reality prototype for pain relief of pediatric burn in Taiwanen_US
dc.typeJournal/Magazine Articleen_US
dc.description.otherinformationAuthor name used in this publication: Joanne W. Y. Chungen_US
dc.identifier.spage786-
dc.identifier.epage793-
dc.identifier.volume16-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2702.2006.01719.x-
dcterms.abstractAim. This study examines the usability and effectiveness of virtual reality in reducing pain in wound-care procedures for pediatric burn patients in Taiwan.-
dcterms.abstractBackground. Virtual reality has continuously gained prominence in the medical arena, for instance, the telepresence for surgery, the management of mental health disorders and pain control of the paediatric burn. Notwithstanding an increased application of virtual reality in the medical arena in North America, there have been no studies investigating its use for paediatric burn patients in Asia.-
dcterms.abstractMethods. This descriptive study has two phases: Phase I: the development of a virtual reality prototype. Phase II: the implementation of the prototype to discern its usability and efficacy with paediatric burn patients at a local hospital.-
dcterms.abstractResults. The findings suggest that a significant difference is found in the children's reported pain, with or without the virtual reality intervention, over the three phases: before, during and after the dressing change. However, less pain was noted in the intervention group during and after the dressing change.-
dcterms.abstractConclusion. Adding to the existing clinical value of virtual reality identifies the nature of and different children's responses to pain with the use of virtual reality.-
dcterms.abstractRelevance to clinical practice. This study is significant since it demonstrates a difference in the child's response to pain based on the nature of presence and distraction. Moreover, given the evidence that a decrease in anxiety was experienced after the dressing change with virtual reality intervention, timing of using the virtual reality intervention before the child develops conditioning anxiety and anticipated pain for the procedure would be of importance.-
dcterms.bibliographicCitationJournal of clinical nursing, Apr. 2007, v. 16, no. 4, p. 786-793-
dcterms.isPartOfJournal of clinical nursing-
dcterms.issued2007-04-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000245312200022-
dc.identifier.scopus2-s2.0-34047170833-
dc.identifier.pmid17402961-
dc.identifier.eissn1365-2702-
dc.identifier.rosgroupidr32445-
dc.description.ros2006-2007 > Academic research: refereed > Publication in refereed journal-
dc.description.oapublished_final-
Appears in Collections:Journal/Magazine Article
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