Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/32777
Title: Generation of vortices by a streamwise oscillating cylinder
Authors: Alam, MM
Fu, S
Zhou, Y
Keywords: Binary vortex
Streamwise oscillating cylinder
Vortex formation mechanism
Issue Date: 2007
Publisher: Ios Press
Source: Journal of visualization, 2007, v. 10, no. 1, p. 65-73 How to cite?
Journal: Journal of Visualization 
Abstract: The wake of a streamwise oscillating cylinder is presently investigated. The Reynolds number investigated is 300, based on the cylinder diameter d. The cylinder oscillates at an amplitude of 0.5 d and a frequency fe/fs=1.8, where fe is the cylinder oscillating frequency and fs is the natural vortex shedding frequency of a stationary cylinder. Under these conditions the flow is essentially two dimensional. A two-dimensional direct numerical simulation (DNS) scheme has been developed to calculate the flow. The DNS results display a street of binary vortices, each containing two counter-rotating vortical structures, symmetrical about the centerline, which is in excellent agreement with measurements. The drag and lift on the cylinder have been examined. The time averaged drag and lift are 1.4 and 0, respectively, which are the same as those on a stationary cylinder at the same Re. However, the fluctuating drag was high, about 2.68. It has been found that, being symmetrically formed about the centerline, the binary vortices induce an essentially zero fluctuating lift, which may have a profound implication in flow control and engineering.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/32777
ISSN: 1343-8875
DOI: 10.1007/BF03181805
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