Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/32255
Title: Use of tensorial description in tissue remodeling : examples of F-actin distributions in pulmonary arteries in hypoxic hypertension
Authors: Huang, W
Mak, YW
Chen, PCY
Keywords: Blood vessel
Fibrous protein
Tensor
Zero-stress state
Issue Date: 2011
Source: Mcb molecular and cellular biomechanics, 2011, v. 8, no. 2, p. 91-104 How to cite?
Journal: MCB Molecular and Cellular Biomechanics 
Abstract: A molecular configuration tensor Pij was introduced to analyze the distribution of fibrous proteins in vascular cells for studying cells and tissues biomechanics. We have used this technique to study the biomechanics of vascular remodeling in response to the changes of blood pressure and flow. In this paper, the remodeling of the geometrical arrangement of F-actin fibers in the smooth muscle cells in rat's pulmonary arteries in hypoxic hypertension was studied. The rats were exposed to a hypoxia condition of 10% for 0, 2, 12, and 24 hr at sea level. Remodeling of blood vessels were studied at the in vivo state under normal perfusion, no-load state when small rings from blood vessels were excised, and zero-stress state after the rings were cut open radially to release the residual stress. Tissue remodeling in response to changes in blood pressure is reflected in the zero-stress state. The tensor components were determined by analyzing the configuration of phalloidin stained F-actin fibers in the media layer of pulmonary arteries. The values of P31, P 32, P33 in the in-vivo state, the no-load state, and the zero-stress state are obtained. This study demonstrated the distributions of fibrous molecules in tissue remodeling can be described quantitatively using the molecular configuration tensor.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/32255
ISSN: 1556-5297
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