Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/32175
Title: Work at height fatalities in the repair, maintenance, alteration, and addition works
Authors: Chan, APC 
Wong, FKW 
Chan, DWM 
Yam, MCH 
Kwok, AWK
Lam, EWM
Cheung, E
Keywords: Construction industry
Fatalities
Hong Kong
Occupational safety
Issue Date: 2008
Publisher: American Society of Civil Engineers
Source: Journal of construction engineering and management, 2008, v. 134, no. 7, p. 527-535 How to cite?
Journal: Journal of construction engineering and management 
Abstract: Hong Kong's construction industry has shown significant improvement in safety performance since the turn of the century. The number of industrial accidents in the construction industry has decreased from 11,925 in 2000 to 3,833 in 2004, which is an encouraging drop of almost 68%. However, the category "fall of person from height" has always represented a large proportion of the industrial accidents, particularly fatal accidents. In 2004, fall of person from height represented just over 47% of the total number of fatal accidents in the construction industry. The statistics show that although the overall number of accidents has dropped immensely, the same does not apply for fall from height accidents. According to statistics provided by the Labor Dept. of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, there were a total of 22 fatal industrial accidents associated with fall of persons from height in repair, maintenance, alteration, and addition works during 2000-2004. When analyzing these case studies, 12 common factors were identified for analyzing these case studies and strategies were suggested to prevent recurrence of similar accidents in each case. The top five strategies were: (1) provide and maintain a safe system of work; (2) provide a suitable working platform; (3) (tier) provide safety information/training/instruction/supervision; (4) (tier) provide suitable fall arresting system/anchorage; and (5) maintain safe workplace.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/32175
ISSN: 0733-9364
EISSN: 1943-7862
DOI: 10.1061/(ASCE)0733-9364(2008)134:7(527)
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