Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/31121
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributorDepartment of Health Technology and Informatics-
dc.contributorSchool of Nursing-
dc.creatorFrench, PH-
dc.creatorBoost, M-
dc.creatorChan, TMF-
dc.creatorHo, K-
dc.creatorLee, ASW-
dc.creatorSuen, LKP-
dc.creatorYoung, P-
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-23T09:14:39Z-
dc.date.available2015-06-23T09:14:39Z-
dc.identifier.issn1818-6270-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10397/31121-
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherScientific Communications Internationalen_US
dc.subjectClinical nursing researchen_US
dc.subjectNursingen_US
dc.subjectNursing methodology researchen_US
dc.subjectPatient complianceen_US
dc.subjectTreatment refusalen_US
dc.titleEstimating patients adherence to prescribed medication for nursing research : a pilot studyen_US
dc.typeJournal/Magazine Articleen_US
dc.identifier.spage34-
dc.identifier.epage42-
dc.identifier.volume9-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dcterms.abstractAims: To pilot test recruitment and data collection methods for studying adherence to short-term antibiotic treatment regimes for use in nurse intervention studies. Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive study evaluated the utility of 3 measures of medication adherence: self-reported behaviour, electronic monitoring, and urine culture. The sample consisted of 30 subjects of Chinese ethnic origin attending a single accident emergency department in a local general hospital. Cluster analysis was used in order to compare the methods of estimating adherence. Results: The protocols developed proved to be effective for the collection of adherence data. Cluster analysis identified 3 separate clusters in the sample: relatively high adherers whose attitude to adherence was a good indicator of their behaviour; subjects who admitted adherence errors, but whose actual adherence was the highest monitored; and subjects with relatively high self-reported but low monitored adherence. Data for this sample show that treatment may be totally ineffective in at least 30% of subjects. Conclusions: This pilot study confirmed the feasibility of these data collection processes in the Chinese context and their suitability for application in further study of the effects of a brief structured nursing intervention.-
dcterms.bibliographicCitationAsian journal of nursing, 2006, v. 9, no. 1, p. 34-42-
dcterms.isPartOfAsian journal of nursing-
dcterms.issued2006-
dc.identifier.scopus2-s2.0-33744913567-
dc.identifier.rosgroupidr26353-
dc.description.ros2005-2006 > Academic research: refereed > Publication in refereed journal-
Appears in Collections:Journal/Magazine Article
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