Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/30758
Title: Effects of spinal cord injury on c-fos expression in hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and supraoptic nucleus in rats
Authors: Xu, Y
Zheng, Z
Ho, KP
Qian, Z
Keywords: Area-specific effect
Immunocytochemistry
Neuronal activation
The weight-drop model
Wistar rat
Issue Date: 2006
Publisher: Elsevier
Source: Brain research, 2006, v. 1087, no. 1, p. 175-179 How to cite?
Journal: Brain research 
Abstract: The effects of spinal cord injury (SCI) on c-fos expression in hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and supraoptic nucleus (SON) in rats were investigated. As hypothesized, SCI has a significant effect on neuronal responses in the PVN and SON. A significant increase in c-fos in the PVN was found at 1, 6, 12 and 24 h following SCI, implying that the neurons in the PVN can be activated soon after SCI and persist for at least 24 h. However, in contrast to the PVN, SCI did not induce a significant increase in c-fos expression in the SON until 12 h following SCI. The highest expression of c-fos in the SON was found at the end point of this study (24 h) following SCI. The data demonstrated that SCI can significantly activate neurons in the PVN and SON. The activated neurons might involve in the initiation of a variety biochemical, ischemic and other injury processes. The area-specific effects of SCI on the PVN and SON suggest that these nuclei might play their roles in different stages in the prolonged time course following SCI.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/30758
ISSN: 0006-8993
EISSN: 1872-6240
DOI: 10.1016/j.brainres.2006.03.003
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