Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/30481
Title: A new learning environment for social change : the engineering and product design learning environment in Hong Kong
Authors: Siu, KWM 
Issue Date: 2003
Publisher: UNESCO, International Centre for Engineering Education
Source: World transactions on engineering and technology education, 2003, v. 2, no. 1, p. 73-78 How to cite?
Journal: World transactions on engineering and technology education 
Abstract: Increasing changes in industry and society have necessitated changes in curricula so as to ensure that the knowledge and experiences gained by engineering and product design students at universities remains relevant. The article reviews the current learning environments for engineering and product design training. It indicates that part-time students encounter difficulties in following a rigid timetable and attending classes at their university. Utilising Hong Kong as a case study, the article further discusses how a learning environment should be restructured for these students in order to meet the changing needs of society and industry by identifying three key areas that require attention, namely: curriculum planning, administration and implementation. The article presents a subject in a part-time engineering and product design programme that was implemented at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, China, called Cultural and Social Issues in Product Design, wherein students were given flexibility in organising their learning requirements. While there are limitations and constraints in delivering such a flexible learning system, it should not exclude the consideration and implementation of flexible learning systems in university learning environments.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/30481
ISSN: 1446-2257
Appears in Collections:Journal/Magazine Article

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