Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/28589
Title: Texture competition during thin film deposition - Effects of grain boundary migration
Authors: Huang, H
Gilmer, GH
Issue Date: 2002
Publisher: Elsevier
Source: Computational materials science, 2002, v. 23, no. 1-4, p. 190-196 How to cite?
Journal: Computational materials science 
Abstract: In this paper, we describe an implementation of grain boundary migration in the atomistic simulator of thin film deposition (ADEPT), and apply the simulator to study effects of the grain boundary migration on texture evolution. In the implementation, atoms are classified into two categories: those belong to a single grain and those at grain boundaries. An atom is defined as one at a grain boundary if it has more than half of its neighbors occupied and not all of the neighboring atoms are in the same grain. The grain boundary atom is attempted to re-align with neighboring grains to represent the grain boundary migration; the attempt probability is defined by the grain boundary migration coefficient. Our studies show that grain boundary migration does not always assist formation of texture with a top surface of the lowest energy. At the nucleation stage of thin film deposition, high migration coefficient of grain boundaries may enhance the formation of grain nuclei with top surfaces of higher energy, and therefore effectively may suppress formation of textures with a top surface of the lowest energy. This effect may provide an extra dimension to engineer textures of thin films.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/28589
ISSN: 0927-0256
DOI: 10.1016/S0927-0256(01)00234-8
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