Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/28011
Title: A randomised controlled trial of the effectiveness of an exercise training program in patients recovering from severe acute respiratory syndrome
Authors: Lau, HMC
Ng, GYF 
Jones, AYM
Lee, EWC
Siu, EHK
Hui, DSC
Keywords: Exercise training
Physiotherapy
Randomised controlled trials
Rehabilitation
Severe acute respiratory syndrome
Issue Date: 2005
Source: Australian journal of physiotherapy, 2005, v. 51, no. 4, p. 213-219 How to cite?
Journal: Australian Journal of Physiotherapy 
Abstract: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an exercise training program on cardiorespiratory and musculoskeletal performance and health-related quality of life of patients who were recovering from severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). A 6-week supervised exercise training program was carried out in the physiotherapy department of a university teaching hospital. One hundred and thirty-three patients referred from a SARS Review Clinic solely for physiotherapy were included. Cardiorespiratory fitness (6-minute walk test, Chester Step Test for predicting VO2max), musculoskeletal performance (isometric deltoid and gluteal muscles strength, handgrip strength, 1-minute curl-up and push-up tests) and health-related quality of life (SF-36) were measured and evaluated. Patients were assigned randomly to either a control group (standardised educational session about exercise rehabilitation) or an exercise group. After 6 weeks, significantly greater improvement was shown in the exercise group in the 6-minute walk test (77.4 m vs 20.7 m, p < 0.001), VO2max (3.6 ml/kg/min vs 1 ml/kg/min, p = 0.04), and musculoskeletal performance (handgrip strength, curl-up and push-up tests, p < 0.05). Effects on health-related quality of life were not statistically significant. It was concluded that the exercise training program was effective in improving both the cardiorespiratory and musculoskeletal fitness in patients recovering from SARS. However, health-related quality of life was not affected by physical training.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/28011
ISSN: 0004-9514
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