Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/27151
Title: The effect of a β-adrenoceptor antagonist on accommodative adaptation in Hong Kong children
Authors: Chen, JC
Schmid, KL
Brown, B
Edwards, MH
Keywords: Accommodation
Children
Myopia
Nearwork
Sympathetic innervation
Issue Date: 2005
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Source: Current eye research, 2005, v. 30, no. 3, p. 179-188 How to cite?
Journal: Current eye research 
Abstract: Purpose: Increased susceptibility to nearwork-induced accommodative adaptation has been suggested as a risk factor for myopia development. We investigated whether accommodative adaptation may explain in part the high prevalence of myopia in Hong Kong children and examined the effect of β-antagonism with topical timolol maleate on accommodative adaptation. Methods: Thirty children (10 emmetropes and 20 myopes) aged between 8 and 12 years were recruited. Tonic accommodation was measured before and after 5 min of video game-playing using an open-field Shin-Nippon auto refractor. Measurements were repeated 30 min after timolol instillation. Results: Children with progressing myopia demonstrated accommodative adaptation following the near task, whereas stable myopes showed counter-adaptive, hyperopic accommodative changes. Timolol increased the magnitude of accommodative adaptation in the stable myopes but had little effect on responses of the progressing myopes or emmetropes. Conclusions: Neuropharmacological modulation of the accommodative system may have a possible etiological role in the progression of myopia.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/27151
ISSN: 0271-3683
EISSN: 1460-2202
DOI: 10.1080/02713680490908571
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