Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/26586
Title: Constraints of using thermostatic expansion valves to operate air-cooled chillers at lower condensing temperatures
Authors: Yu, FW
Chan, KT 
Chu, HY
Keywords: Air-cooled chiller
Condensing temperature
Differential pressure
Thermostatic expansion valve
Issue Date: 2006
Publisher: Pergamon Press
Source: Applied thermal engineering, 2006, v. 26, no. 17-18, p. 2470-2478 How to cite?
Journal: Applied thermal engineering 
Abstract: Thermostatic expansion valves (TXVs) have long been used in air-cooled chillers to implement head pressure control under which the condensing temperature is kept high at around 50 °C by staging condenser fans as few as possible. This paper considers how TXVs prevent the chillers from operating with an increased COP at lower condensing temperatures when the chiller load or outdoor temperature drops. An analysis on an existing air-cooled reciprocating chiller showed that the range of differential pressures across TXVs restricts the maximum heat rejection airflow required to increase the chiller COP, though the set point of condensing temperature is reduced to 22 °C from a high level of 45 °C. It is possible to use electronic expansion valves to meet the differential pressure requirements for maximum chiller COP. There is a maximum of 28.7% increase in the chiller COP when the heat rejection airflow is able to be maximized in various operating conditions. The results of this paper emphasize criteria for lowering the condensing temperature to enhance the performance of air-cooled chillers.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/26586
ISSN: 1359-4311
EISSN: 1873-5606
DOI: 10.1016/j.applthermaleng.2005.11.018
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