Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/26239
Title: Low-energy design for air-cooled chiller plants in air-conditioned buildings
Authors: Yu, FW
Chan, KT 
Keywords: Building cooling load
Chilled water pumps
Chillers
Coefficient of performance
Electricity consumption
Issue Date: 2006
Publisher: Elsevier
Source: Energy and Buildings, 2006, v. 38, no. 4, p. 334-339 How to cite?
Journal: Energy and buildings 
Abstract: Chillers are widely used for cooling buildings in the subtropical regions at the expense of considerable energy. This paper discusses how the number and size of air-cooled chillers in a chiller plant should be designed to improve their energy performance. Using an experimentally verified chiller model, four design options were studied for a chiller plant handling the cooling load profile of an office building. Using chillers of different sizes is desirable to increase the number of steps of total cooling capacity. This enables the chillers to operate frequently at or near full load to save chiller power. Pumping energy can also be saved because of the improved control of chilled water flow whereby the chilled water supplied by the staged chillers can match with that required by air side equipment for most of the operating time. It is estimated that the annual electricity consumption of chiller plants could drop by 9.4% with the use of unequally sized chillers. The findings of this research will offer guidance on how to select chillers of different sizes for a low-energy chiller plant.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/26239
ISSN: 0378-7788
EISSN: 1872-6178
DOI: 10.1016/j.enbuild.2005.07.004
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