Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/24573
Title: The role of self-efficacy in the Alzheimer's family caregiver stress process : a partial mediator between physical health and depressive symptoms
Authors: Au, A 
Lau, KM
Sit, E
Cheung, G
Lai, MK
Wong, SKA
Fok, D
Issue Date: 2010
Publisher: Routledge Journals, Taylor & Francis Ltd
Source: Clinical gerontologist, 2010, v. 33, no. 4, p. 298-315 How to cite?
Journal: Clinical Gerontologist 
Abstract: Physical health has been commonly regarded as an outcome in caregiving research; however, it may act as a predictor of depressive symptoms of caregivers. This current study investigated the relationship between physical health and depression in family caregivers of persons with Alzheimer's disease. Also, it examined caregiving self-efficacy as a possible mediator of the relationship. One hundred thirty-four family caregivers were interviewed. The caregivers self-reported their current physical health status, depressive symptoms, and perceived self-efficacy. Using a self-efficacy measure consisting of three subscales, path analyses were conducted to specifically assess these domains of caregiving self-efficacy. The results showed that poorer perceived physical health was directly and indirectly associated with increased depressive symptoms. The indirect path was mediated by the specific domain of caregivers' self-efficacy. These findings suggest that caregiving self-efficacy may function as a mechanism through which perceived physical health influences depressive symptoms, and this mechanism can be domain-specific.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/24573
DOI: 10.1080/07317115.2010.502817
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