Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/24540
Title: Diagnosis of the low temperature difference syndrome in the chilled water system of a super high-rise building: A case study
Authors: Gao, DC
Wang, S 
Sun, Y
Xiao, F 
Keywords: Chilled water system
Deficit flow
Fault diagnosis
Low delta-T syndrome
Issue Date: 2012
Publisher: Pergamon Press
Source: Applied energy, 2012, v. 98, p. 597-606 How to cite?
Journal: Applied energy 
Abstract: The low delta-T syndrome exists in many large primary-secondary chilled water systems, which results in the degradation of the system overall energy performance. This paper presents a method and a case study on diagnosing the low delta-T problem resulted from the deficit flow that frequently occurred in the chilled water system of a super high-rise building at its early operation stage. The history operation data during the days when deficit flow and low delta-T syndrome occurred are analyzed. The improper set-point of outlet water temperature on the secondary side of heat exchangers is finally diagnosed as the fault that resulted in the deficit flow and low delta-T syndrome. Diagnosis of this fault was also validated in the in situ experimental tests. The deficit flow could be eliminated if temperature set-point was reset higher. Compared with the original set-point of outlet water temperature on the secondary side of heat exchangers, 87.67. kW (72.37%) of the total power of pumps on primary and secondary sides of heat exchangers could be saved in the test cases when higher set-points were used.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/24540
ISSN: 0306-2619
EISSN: 1872-9118
DOI: 10.1016/j.apenergy.2012.03.057
Appears in Collections:Journal/Magazine Article

Access
View full-text via PolyU eLinks SFX Query
Show full item record

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

6
Last Week
0
Last month
1
Citations as of Sep 22, 2017

WEB OF SCIENCETM
Citations

5
Last Week
0
Last month
0
Citations as of Sep 24, 2017

Page view(s)

38
Last Week
1
Last month
Checked on Sep 25, 2017

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric



Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.