Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/24336
Title: Therapeutic low energy laser improves the mechanical strength of repairing medial collateral ligament
Authors: Fung, DTC
Ng, GYF 
Leung, MCP
Tay, DKC
Keywords: Healing
Injury
Rat
Tissue biomechanics
Treatment
Issue Date: 2002
Source: Lasers in surgery and medicine, 2002, v. 31, no. 2, p. 91-96 How to cite?
Journal: Lasers in Surgery and Medicine 
Abstract: Background and Objectives: Low energy laser therapy has been shown to enhance collagen production but its effect on tissue strength is not well reported. We tested the effects of therapeutic laser on the strength of healing medial collateral ligaments (MCLs) in rats. Study Design/Materials and Methods: Twenty-four rats received surgical transection to their right MCL and eight received sham operation. After surgery, 16 received a single dose of gallium aluminum arsenide laser to their transected MCL for 7.5 minutes (n = 8) or 15 minutes (n = 8) and eight served as control with placebo laser, while the sham group didn't receive any treatment. The MCLs were biomechanically tested at either 3 or 6 weeks post-operation. Results: The normalized ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and stiffness of laser and sham groups were larger than control (P < 0.001). The UTS of laser and sham groups were comparable. Laser and sham groups had improved in stiffness from 3 to 6 weeks (P < 0.001). Conclusions: A single dose of low energy laser therapy improves the UTS and stiffness of repairing MCL at 3 and 6 weeks after injury.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/24336
ISSN: 0196-8092
DOI: 10.1002/lsm.10083
Appears in Collections:Journal/Magazine Article

Access
View full-text via PolyU eLinks SFX Query
Show full item record

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

55
Last Week
0
Last month
0
Citations as of Aug 20, 2017

WEB OF SCIENCETM
Citations

49
Last Week
1
Last month
Citations as of Aug 20, 2017

Page view(s)

37
Last Week
3
Last month
Checked on Aug 20, 2017

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric



Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.