Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/23520
Title: Theoretical and experimental study of highly textured GaAs on silicon using a graphene buffer layer
Authors: Alaskar, Y
Arafin, S
Lin, Q
Wickramaratne, D
McKay, J
Norman, AG
Zhang, Z
Yao, L
Ding, F 
Zou, J
Goorsky, MS
Lake, RK
Zurbuchen, MA
Wang, KL
Keywords: Molecular beam epitaxy
Thin film
Semiconducting gallium arsenide
Semiconducting III-V materials
Semiconducting silicon
Issue Date: 2015
Publisher: North-Holland
Source: Journal of crystal growth, 2015 How to cite?
Journal: Journal of crystal growth 
Abstract: A novel heteroepitaxial growth technique, quasi-van der Waals epitaxy, promises the ability to deposit three-dimensional GaAs materials on silicon using two-dimensional graphene as a buffer layer by overcoming the lattice and thermal expansion mismatch. In this study, density functional theory (DFT) simulations were performed to understand the interactions at the GaAs/graphene hetero-interface as well as the growth orientations of GaAs on graphene. To develop a better understanding of the molecular beam epitaxy-grown GaAs films on graphene, samples were characterized by x-ray diffraction (θ-2. θ scan, ω-scan, grazing incidence XRD and pole figure measurement) and transmission electron microscopy. The realizations of smooth GaAs films with a strong (111) oriented fiber-texture on graphene/silicon using this deposition technique are a milestone towards an eventual demonstration of the epitaxial growth of GaAs on silicon, which is necessary for integrated photonics application.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/23520
ISSN: 0022-0248
DOI: 10.1016/j.jcrysgro.2015.02.003
Appears in Collections:Journal/Magazine Article

Access
View full-text via PolyU eLinks SFX Query
Show full item record

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

2
Last Week
0
Last month
0
Citations as of Aug 13, 2017

WEB OF SCIENCETM
Citations

3
Last Week
0
Last month
0
Citations as of Aug 14, 2017

Page view(s)

40
Last Week
2
Last month
Checked on Aug 13, 2017

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric



Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.