Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/23248
Title: Mass transport mechanism of Cu species at the metal/dielectric interfaces with a graphene barrier
Authors: Zhao, Y
Liu, Z
Sun, T
Zhang, L
Jie, W
Wang, X
Xie, Y
Tsang, YH 
Long, H
Chai, Y 
Keywords: Barrier
Cu interconnect
Graphene
Mass transport
Issue Date: 2014
Publisher: American Chemical Society
Source: ACS nano, 2014, v. 8, no. 12, p. 12601-12611 How to cite?
Journal: ACS nano 
Abstract: The interface between the metal and dielectric is an indispensable part in various electronic devices. The migration of metallic species into the dielectric can adversely affect the reliability of the insulating dielectric and can also form a functional solid-state electrolyte device. In this work, we insert graphene between Cu and SiO2 as a barrier layer and investigate the mass transport mechanism of Cu species through the graphene barrier using density functional theory calculations, second-ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), capacitance-voltage measurement, and cyclic voltammetry. Our theoretical calculations suggest that the major migration path for Cu species to penetrate through the multiple-layered graphene is the overlapped defects larger than 0.25 nm2. The depth-profile SIMS characterizations indicate that the "critical" thickness of the graphene barrier for completely blocking the Cu migration is 5 times smaller than that of the conventional TaN barrier. Capacitance-voltage and cyclic voltammetry measurement reveal that the electrochemical reactions at the Cu/SiO2 interface become a rate-limiting factor during the bias-temperature stressing process with the use of a graphene barrier. These studies provide a distinct roadmap for designing controllable mass transport in solid-state electrolyte devices with the use of a graphene barrier.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/23248
ISSN: 1936-0851
EISSN: 1936-086X
DOI: 10.1021/nn5054987
Appears in Collections:Journal/Magazine Article

Access
View full-text via PolyU eLinks SFX Query
Show full item record

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

14
Last Week
0
Last month
1
Citations as of Oct 9, 2017

WEB OF SCIENCETM
Citations

13
Last Week
0
Last month
0
Citations as of Oct 9, 2017

Page view(s)

57
Last Week
0
Last month
Checked on Oct 15, 2017

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric



Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.