Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/21905
Title: Synthesis and characterization of silica-encapsulated iron oxide nanoparticles
Authors: Du, Y
Li, L
Leung, CW 
Lai, PT
Pong, PWT
Keywords: Core-shell nanoparticles
Iron oxide nanoparticles
Magnetic particle imaging (MPI)
Microemulsion
Issue Date: 2014
Publisher: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
Source: IEEE transactions on magnetics, 2014, v. 50, no. 1, 2272215 How to cite?
Journal: IEEE transactions on magnetics 
Abstract: The properties of magnetic core-shell nanoparticles greatly depend on their core sizes and shell materials. Silica shell can prevent the magnetic nanoparticles from corrosion and agglomeration. In addition, the hydrolyzed silica can provide silanol groups to facilitate surface biofunctionalization. In this paper, superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles coated with SiO2 shell were prepared by a one-pot water-in-oil microemulsion method. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) were utilized to characterize the morphology and magnetic properties of the synthesized nanoparticles. The results indicated that by tuning the water/surfactant molar ratio (Wo) of the microemulsion system, core size of the resulting Fe3O4 nanoparticles can be altered. The size-controllable silica-encapsulated Fe 3O4 superparamagnetic nanoparticles have great potential to be applied as multifunctional tracer materials for magnetic particle imaging (MPI).
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/21905
ISSN: 0018-9464
EISSN: 1941-0069
DOI: 10.1109/TMAG.2013.2272215
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