Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/21886
Title: The mobility, bioavailability, and human bioaccessibility of trace metals in urban soils of Hong Kong
Authors: Luo, XS
Yu, S
Li, XD 
Issue Date: 2012
Source: Applied geochemistry, 2012, v. 27, no. 5, p. 995-1004 How to cite?
Journal: Applied Geochemistry 
Abstract: Trace metals in soils may pose risks to both ecosystem and human health, especially in an urban environment. However, only a fraction of the metal content in soil is mobile and/or available for biota uptake and human ingestion. Various environmental availabilities of trace metals (Cu, Pb and Zn) in topsoil from highly urbanized areas of Hong Kong to plants, organisms, and humans, as well as the leaching potential to groundwater were evaluated in the present study. Forty selected soil samples were extracted with 0.11. M acid acetic, 0.01. M calcium chloride, 0.005. M diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid, and simplified physiologically based extraction tests (PBET) for the operationally defined mobilizable, effectively bioavailable, potentially bioavailable, and human bioaccessible metal fractions, respectively. The metals were generally in the order of Zn. >. Cu. ~. Pb for both mobility (24%, 7.6%, 6.7%) and effective bioavailability (2.8%, 0.9%, 0.6%), Pb (18%). >. Cu (13%). >. Zn (7.4%) for potential bioavailability, and Pb (59%). ~. Cu (58%). >. Zn (38%) for human bioaccessibility. Although the variations in the different available concentrations of metals could mostly be explained by total metal concentrations in soil, the regression model predictions were further improved by the incorporation of soil physicochemical properties (pH, OM, EC). The effectively bioavailable Zn and Pb were mostly related to soil pH. Anthropogenic Pb in urban soils tended to be environmentally available as indicated by Pb isotopic composition analysis. Combining various site-specific environmental availabilities might produce a more realistic estimation for the integrated ecological and human health risks of metal contamination in urban soils.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/21886
ISSN: 0883-2927
DOI: 10.1016/j.apgeochem.2011.07.001
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