Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/21723
Title: The degradation of xenobiotic branched carboxylic acids in anaerobic sediment of the Pearl River in Southern China
Authors: Chua, H
Yu, PHF
Lo, WH 
Sin, SN
Keywords: Anaerobic bacteria
Beta-oxidation
Carboxylic acid
Degradation
Fatty acid biodegradation
Sediment
Issue Date: 2001
Publisher: Elsevier
Source: Science of the total environment, 2001, v. 266, no. 1-3, p. 221-228 How to cite?
Journal: Science of the total environment 
Abstract: Xenobiotic branched carboxylic acids (BCAs) discharged by industries are often persistent in biological wastewater treatment systems and end up in water and sediments. In this study, the degradation of 12 typical BCAs in an anaerobic environment of river sediment was studied in vitro using enrichment shake-flask cultures. The anaerobic consortium taken from the river sediment, comprising BCA-degrading and methane-producing genera, degraded BCAs with tertiary carbons through beta-oxidation, followed by methanogenesis mechanisms. The maximum cell densities in the cultures using BCAs as the sole carbon source ranged between 5.0 and 6.0×105 cells/ml. The maximum degradation rates were between 5.0 and 8.5×10-3 mmol/h. The consortium could not degrade BCAs with quaternary carbons. The degree of branching at the alpha or beta position along the carbon chain interfered with the beta-oxidation mechanisms. These BCAs would accumulate in the sediment and significantly affect the cycling of organic carbon and nutrients.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/21723
ISSN: 0048-9697
EISSN: 1879-1026
DOI: 10.1016/S0048-9697(00)00750-6
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