Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/21030
Title: Induced voltages and power losses in single-conductor armored cables
Authors: Du, Y 
Wang, XH
Yuan, ZH
Keywords: Cable
Induced voltage
Metallic tray
Power loss
Issue Date: 2009
Publisher: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
Source: IEEE transactions on industry applications, 2009, v. 45, no. 6, p. 2145-2151 How to cite?
Journal: IEEE transactions on industry applications 
Abstract: Single-conductor armored cables are often used to carry high currents in buildings. This paper presents an experimental investigation into both induced voltages and cable resistances associated with the installation of these cables within the buildings. Both induced armor voltages and cable resistances under different installation practices were measured at both power frequency and its harmonic frequencies. The impact of cable formation, bonding arrangement, and cable supporting method on these issues was addressed and illustrated experimentally via 185-mm(2) (365-kcmil) single-conductor armored copper stranded cables. The standing voltage is generally small for the armored cables used in the buildings. The power losses increase significantly when the cable armor is bonded at two cable ends, particularly in the case of rich harmonic currents in the cables. Recommendations are finally provided for the installation of single-conductor armored cables in buildings.
Description: 43rd Annual Meeting of the IEEE-Industry-Applications-Society, Edmonton, Canada, 5-9 October 2008
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/21030
ISSN: 0093-9994
EISSN: 1939-9367
DOI: 10.1109/TIA.2009.2031904
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