Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/20276
Title: Enforced bipedal downhill running induces Achilles tendinosis in rats
Authors: Ng, GYF 
Chung, PYM
Wang, JS
Cheung, RTH 
Keywords: Achilles tendon
Degeneration
Downhill running
Strength
Tendinopathy
Issue Date: 2011
Source: Connective tissue research, 2011, v. 52, no. 6, p. 466-471 How to cite?
Journal: Connective Tissue Research 
Abstract: Enforced downhill running has been reported to induce tendinosis in the rat supraspinatus tendon but similar exercise failed to induce Achilles tendinosis in this animal. Due to the presence of acromial arch in the shoulder, accessing the supraspinatus tendon with physical modalities is difficult; thus this model may not be suitable for studying the treatment for tendinosis. To develop a rat model for Achilles tendinosis, we tested 14 mature SpragueDawley rats by dividing them into 2 groups of 7 each. The experimental group was subjected to a daily enforced downhill bipedal running program by suspending their upper bodies so that they ran with their hind limbs on a treadmill for 1 hr/day for 8 weeks. The downward inclination was 20°and the speed was 17 m/min. The animals in the control group did not undergo any exercise. After 8 weeks, the Achilles tendons were harvested and subjected to histological and biomechanical analysis. Histological examination revealed tenocyte proliferation, change in tenocytes appearance, and collagen bundle disintegration in the running group. The biomechanical testing revealed significant decrease in stiffness (p=0.002) and ultimate tensile strength (p=0.016) in the running group than in the control group. Both the histological and biomechanical findings are suggestive of changes in the tendon of the running group that resembled the pathological changes of tendinosis in human. This new model of Achilles tendinosis in rat will be useful for studying the etiology and subsequent management strategies of this condition.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/20276
ISSN: 0300-8207
DOI: 10.3109/03008207.2011.562334
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