Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/19690
Title: Is there a place for auricular therapy in the realm of nursing?
Authors: Suen, LKP
Wong, TKS
Leung, AWN
Issue Date: 2001
Source: Complementary therapies in nursing and midwifery, 2001, v. 7, no. 3, p. 132-139 How to cite?
Journal: Complementary Therapies in Nursing and Midwifery 
Abstract: Several theories, such as the `homuncular reflex theory', `delta reflex theory', and `meridian theory', point to the fact that the ear is related to all parts of the human body and internal organs. Being one of the approaches in traditional Chinese medicine, auricular therapy is a therapeutic method by which specific points on the auricle are punctured or pressed. Auricular therapy can activate meridians and collaterals, regulate the Qi and blood, help to achieve the balance between Yin and Yang status of internal organs, and is therefore suitable for treating many disorders of the body. Successful examples of previous studies using this therapy including insomnia, weight reduction, hypertension, treatment of addiction, and pain reduction. However, inconsistency in the treatment protocol among studies, or the use of combined therapies, makes it impossible to draw a strong causal relationship between this therapy and the treatment effect. More appropriate clinical trials are therefore necessary to understand in depth the therapeutic effect of auricular therapy. Ideally, these trials can take place in the context of nursing practice so as to explore the application of this therapy in the realm of nursing, and to enable nurses to make a more effective contribution to primary health care.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/19690
ISSN: 1353-6117
DOI: 10.1054/ctnm.2001.0565
Appears in Collections:Journal/Magazine Article

Access
View full-text via PolyU eLinks SFX Query
Show full item record

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

25
Last Week
0
Last month
0
Citations as of Aug 20, 2017

Page view(s)

25
Last Week
1
Last month
Checked on Aug 20, 2017

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric



Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.