Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/19033
Title: Potential toxic risk of heavy metals from sediment of the Pearl River in South China
Authors: Niu, H
Deng, W
Wu, Q
Chen, X
Keywords: heavy metal
potential toxicity
sediment
sediment quality guidelines
Issue Date: 2009
Publisher: Elsevier
Source: Journal of environmental sciences, 2009, v. 21, no. 8, p. 1053-1058 How to cite?
Journal: Journal of environmental sciences 
Abstract: Based on the monitoring of five heavy metal elements in the surface sediments of the Pearl River in South China, potential toxicity of the heavy metals was assessed using consensus-based sediment quality guidelines (SQGs) method and geo-accumulation (Igeo) index method. The monitoring results showed the heavy metal concentrations were significantly and positively correlated with each other, demonstrating a common trend in variation of concentration in the surface sediments. The assessment using the consensus-based SQGs method showed the potential toxicity of Cu was the highest, and Cd was the lowest. The evaluation based on mean probable effect concentration (PEC) quotient showed the region was seriously polluted with high toxicity heavy metals. Correlation analysis revealed a significant and positive correlation between the mean PEC quotient and the average of Igeo with a correlation coefficient of 0.926 (n = 23, P < 0.01). In conclusion, the consensus-based SQGs and mean PEC quotient are applicable to assess potential toxicity risks of heavy metals in freshwater sediments in the Pearl River.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/19033
ISSN: 1001-0742
EISSN: 1878-7320
DOI: 10.1016/S1001-0742(08)62381-5
Appears in Collections:Journal/Magazine Article

Access
View full-text via PolyU eLinks SFX Query
Show full item record

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

70
Last Week
1
Last month
0
Citations as of Aug 15, 2017

WEB OF SCIENCETM
Citations

53
Last Week
0
Last month
1
Citations as of Aug 20, 2017

Page view(s)

34
Last Week
0
Last month
Checked on Aug 20, 2017

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric



Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.