Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/18567
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributorDepartment of Rehabilitation Sciences-
dc.creatorChung, JCC-
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-23T09:12:21Z-
dc.date.available2015-06-23T09:12:21Z-
dc.identifier.issn0283-9318-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10397/18567-
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectGeriatric rehabilitationen_US
dc.subjectInquiry-based learningen_US
dc.subjectOccupational therapyen_US
dc.subjectSelf-directed learningen_US
dc.titleActive learning of geriatric rehabilitation : deliberations of an undergraduate occupational therapy programmeen_US
dc.typeJournal/Magazine Articleen_US
dc.identifier.spage250-
dc.identifier.epage256-
dc.identifier.volume15-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.doi10.1046/j.1471-6712.2001.00033.x-
dcterms.abstractOccupational therapists working in geriatric rehabilitation must possess skills of self-directed learning and critical thinking, but conventional teaching-learning strategies are limited in acquiring the said skills. This action research aimed at developing in students an ability for active learning and problem solving. An inquiry-based learning (IBL) methodology was introduced to two geriatric-related subjects of an undergraduate occupational therapy (OT) programme. Students worked on four real-life problems in tutorials and participated in service learning. Lectures were carefully structured to consolidate theoretical knowledge generated from the problems. This study was evaluated qualitatively through interviews of both students and clinical educators, and reflective journals. Students found the problems and service learning stimulating enough to encourage active learning and develop basic study skills. Likewise, clinical educators noted students to be more competent when working with geriatric clients than former students who learned through a conventional curriculum. However, the IBL methodology was stressful in areas related to consistency of teaching-learning strategies across curriculum, workload and time constraints. Curriculum review, development of resource files and provision of systematic support are some of the recommendations to the challenges encountered. To conclude, the IBL approach provides appropriate learning environments that foster in students a self-directed learning attitude in the study of geriatric rehabilitation.-
dcterms.bibliographicCitationScandinavian journal of caring sciences, 2001, v. 15, no. 3, p. 250-256-
dcterms.isPartOfScandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences-
dcterms.issued2001-
dc.identifier.scopus2-s2.0-0035724580-
dc.identifier.pmid11564233-
dc.identifier.rosgroupidr06680-
dc.description.ros2001-2002 > Academic research: refereed > Publication in refereed journal-
Appears in Collections:Journal/Magazine Article
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