Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/17792
Title: The association between psychosocial work factors and future low back pain among nurses in Hong Kong : a prospective study
Authors: Yip, YB
Issue Date: 2002
Source: Psychology, health and medicine, 2002, v. 7, no. 2, p. 223-233 How to cite?
Journal: Psychology, Health and Medicine 
Abstract: This prospective study investigated how psychosocial work factors are associated with new or recurrent low back pain (LBP) among nurses in Hong Kong. A 12-month prospective study was conducted among Hong Kong nurses. Two hundred and thirty-six participants from six district hospitals completed a face-to-face baseline interview and were followed-up by telephone interview. The main psychological work outcome measures included relationships with colleagues, relationships with seniors or supervisors, overall work satisfaction, being under stress and level of enjoyment of her/his work. For the rate of LBP, 12-month incidence of and recurrent LBP were 39% and 62%, respectively. Of the psychosocial risk factors at work that were studied, this prospective study found association between poor work relations with colleagues (adjusted relative risk (RR) = 1.85), comparatively new in the current ward (adjusted RR = 3.29), low mood (adjusted RR = 2.41) and an increased risk of new LBP, but not for recurrent LBP in the sample of nurses in the hospital setting. Our results suggest that one of the potentials to prevent LBP among nurses is likely to lie in facilitating work relations such as teambuilding exercises at the workplace, especially on those who are less experienced in the current ward type.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/17792
ISSN: 1354-8506
DOI: 10.1080/13548500120116157
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