Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/16977
Title: A randomized clinical trial study on the effectiveness of a tele-analogy-based problem-solving programme for people with acquired brain injury (ABI)
Authors: Man, DWK 
Soong, WYL
Tam, SF
Hui-Chan, CWY
Keywords: Acquired brain injury
Problem solving
Rehabilitation
Tele-rehabilitation
Issue Date: 2006
Publisher: IOS Press
Source: Neurorehabilitation, 2006, v. 21, no. 3, p. 205-217 How to cite?
Journal: Neurorehabilitation 
Abstract: Primary objective: The present study reports the results of 103 persons with acquired brain injury who were randomly assigned to one of three 20-session analogy problem-solving skill training groups, namely: online training (through computer video conferencing with interactive software); computer-assisted training (through interactive patient-directed software); therapist administered training (face-to-face therapist guided training activities); and a "no-treatment" control group. Research design: Pre- and post-test quasi-experimental design. Main outcome and results: Individuals' problem-solving skills and self-efficacy in all four groups were assessed over a four-week period. Overall, the training methods were found to be effective in improving problem solving skills regardless of the modes of delivery (except in the case of the control group). The continuous "human touch" characteristics of the therapist-administered group showed significant better improvements in self-efficacy in problem-solving. Conclusion: The statistically significantly improvement in problem solving skills in the online-group suggests that this approach could effectively improve cognitive functions of person with ABI and yield training outcomes comparable to other modes of delivery such as the face-to-face training. The conceptualization and applicability of tele-cognitive rehabilitation, its implications for persons with ABI, and future studies in this research area are also discussed.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/16977
ISSN: 1053-8135
EISSN: 1878-6448
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