Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/16303
Title: Theory of phase transitions in second-order ferroelectric films : effects of surfaces and surface-induced stresses on polarization
Authors: Chew, KH
Wang, CL
Shin, FG
Chan, HLW 
Tilley, DR
Keywords: Ferroelectrics
Thin films
Phase transitions
Issue Date: 2002
Source: Solid state communications, 2002, v. 123, no. 10, p. 457-462 How to cite?
Journal: Solid State Communications 
Abstract: The Landau-Devonshire theory is used to study the inter-relationship between polarization and stress in a second-order ferroelectric thin film, where both polarization and stress are in-plane. The intrinsic effects of surfaces and surface-induced stresses on polarization are considered by the introduction of extrapolation lengths in the formulation. Numerical calculations are made for a freestanding ferroelectric film, which is symmetric with respect to mid plane. The study is performed under the assumption that the polarization is enhanced or suppressed near the film surface. For a film with polarization enhanced near the surface, it is assumed that the surface tends to expand thus inducing a surface-tensile stress ('tensile' surface). Surface-induced compressive stress is assumed to exhibit in surface with polarization suppressed near surface ('compressive' surface). It is shown that a diminishing film size (thickness) has a strong influence on polarization and stress.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/16303
ISSN: 0038-1098
DOI: 10.1016/S0038-1098(02)00253-3
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