Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/16030
Title: Career development and knowledge appropriation : a genealogical critique
Authors: Kamoche, K
Pang, M
Wong, ALY
Keywords: career
employability
employment flexibility
genealogy
knowledge appropriation
power
Issue Date: 2011
Publisher: Sage Publications Ltd
Source: Organization studies, 2011, v. 32, no. 12, p. 1665-1679 How to cite?
Journal: Organization Studies 
Abstract: In the fast-changing and globally competitive business environment, organizations' efforts to appropriate knowledge from their workers will be increasingly resisted by those employees forced into more fragmented and uncertain careers. We interpret this contested scenario in terms of the apparently diametrically opposed ways in which knowledge is conceptualized. The organization sees knowledge as an asset which it seeks to appropriate through mechanisms designed to achieve employment flexibility. However, this process is not unidirectional, as we posit that the individual conceives of their knowledge as 'career capital' and, in building it up as a response to the uncertainties of reconstituted careers, pursues a strategy of employability. With reference to Foucault's genealogical approach, we argue that the above contest not only reflects the shifting employment relationship and economic turbulence, but is in fact a social phenomenon rooted in the knowledge-power dialectic and one which sheds light on individuals' efforts to free themselves from the effects of normalization, thus challenging organizational efforts to appropriate the knowledge inherent in careers.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/16030
DOI: 10.1177/0170840611421249
Appears in Collections:Journal/Magazine Article

Access
View full-text via PolyU eLinks SFX Query
Show full item record

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

14
Last Week
0
Last month
0
Citations as of Sep 11, 2017

WEB OF SCIENCETM
Citations

11
Last Week
0
Last month
0
Citations as of Sep 6, 2017

Page view(s)

38
Last Week
3
Last month
Checked on Sep 18, 2017

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric



Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.