Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/13559
Title: The pattern of electronic game use and related bodily discomfort in Hong Kong primary school children
Authors: Lui, DPY
Szeto, GPY 
Jones, AYM
Keywords: Child
Discomfort
Ergonomics
Posture
Small-screen handheld devices
Issue Date: 2011
Publisher: Pergamon Press
Source: Computers and education, 2011, v. 57, no. 2, p. 1665-1674 How to cite?
Journal: Computers and education 
Abstract: The present study examined the usage pattern of electronic game devices among primary school children in Hong Kong. Commonly used types of games devices were grouped into three main categories: large-screen/TV-based games, small handheld game devices and active game devices. A survey was conducted among 476 students in a local primary school, with 258 males and 205 females in the age range of 8-13. A self-reported questionnaire was administered at the school and students reported on the frequency and duration of play with eight types of common electronic game devices in the past month and any bodily discomforts associated with this activity. The results showed that use of several game devices (as many as 3-5 types) were common, with about 40% of the respondents being weekly users and 18% daily users. The design of the different electronic game controllers may affect the postures and muscle loading in the body in different ways, and prolonged exposure can lead to musculoskeletal symptoms. Nearly one third of the respondents (28.9%) reported some bodily discomfort associated with electronic game use. Neck discomfort was most commonly reported, followed by shoulders and fingers. Use of more than 2 h daily of small-screen handheld game devices significantly increased the risk of developing bodily discomfort in any region with an odds ratio of 4.75. The present results have highlighted the importance of monitoring primary school children's exposure to electronic games, especially with small handheld devices, as this may have adverse effect on their musculoskeletal health.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/13559
ISSN: 0360-1315
EISSN: 1873-782X
DOI: 10.1016/j.compedu.2011.03.008
Appears in Collections:Journal/Magazine Article

Access
View full-text via PolyU eLinks SFX Query
Show full item record

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

11
Last Week
0
Last month
1
Citations as of Aug 19, 2017

WEB OF SCIENCETM
Citations

10
Last Week
0
Last month
1
Citations as of Aug 21, 2017

Page view(s)

38
Last Week
1
Last month
Checked on Aug 21, 2017

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric



Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.