Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/12277
Title: How do five- and six-day work schedules influence the perceptions of hospitality employees in Hong Kong?
Authors: Kucukusta, D 
Denizci Guillet, B 
Lau, S
Keywords: Hong Kong
Organizational commitment
Turnover intention
Work schedules
Issue Date: 2014
Publisher: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group
Source: Asia Pacific journal of tourism research, 2014, v. 19, no. 2, p. 123-143 How to cite?
Journal: Asia Pacific journal of tourism research 
Abstract: In 2006 the Hong Kong government sought to reduce work pressure and increase employee morale by implementing a five-day work scheme for all public service employees. Although average working hours have since decreased 5% compared with those recorded in 2004, the average working week is still too long and Hong Kong has reported the highest turnover rates in Asia, particularly in the hospitality industry. This article investigates the influence of five- and six-day work schedules, both with and without overtime, on employee perceptions of organizational commitment and turnover intentions (TIs) in Hong Kong's hospitality industry. Significant differences were found among the four different work schedules with respect to organizational commitment and TIs. Respondents working the five-day schedule only exhibited higher organizational commitment when compared with their counterparts working a six-day schedule with overtime. Regardless of the influence of overtime, significant differences in TIs were found.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/12277
ISSN: 1094-1665
EISSN: 1741-6507
DOI: 10.1080/10941665.2012.734523
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