Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/11821
Title: Lead-free self-focused piezoelectric transducers for viscous liquid ejection
Authors: Kwok, KW 
Hon, SF
Lin, D
Keywords: Lead-free piezoelectric ceramics
Liquid ejection
Self-focused transducer
Issue Date: 2011
Publisher: Elsevier
Source: Sensors and actuators. A, Physical, 2011, v. 168, no. 1, p. 168-171 How to cite?
Journal: Sensors and actuators. A, Physical 
Abstract: Self-focused piezoelectric transducers using lead-free (K 0.48Na 0.48Li 0.04)(Nb 0.90Sb 0.06Ta 0.04)O 3 piezoelectric ceramic have been fabricated for ejecting viscous liquids in the drop-on-demand mode. The lead-free piezoelectric ceramics, with a dense structure and good piezoelectric properties (d 33 = 230 pC/N and k t = 0.56) are prepared by an ordinary sintering technique, and are used to fabricate the driving and focusing elements (Fresnel zone plates) for the transducers. The Fresnel zone plate is a piezoelectric plate patterned with a series of annular electrodes on its surfaces, and the generated acoustic waves are focused by constructive interference. Our results show that the acoustic waves are effectively self-focused in glycerin (with a viscosity of 1400 mPa s), giving a high pressure at the liquid surface to eject droplets without a nozzle. Driven by a simple wave train comprising a series of sinusoidal voltages with an amplitude of 35 V, a frequency of 4.20 MHz and a duration of 1 ms, the transducer can eject glycerin droplets in the drop-on-demand mode.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/11821
ISSN: 0924-4247
EISSN: 1873-3069
DOI: 10.1016/j.sna.2011.04.011
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