Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/11044
Title: Nocardia foaming control in activated sludge process treating domestic wastewater
Authors: Tsang, YF
Sin, SN
Chua, H
Keywords: Filamentous bacteria
Foaming control
Long-chain fatty acids
Wastewater treatment
Issue Date: 2008
Publisher: Elsevier
Source: Bioresource technology, 2008, v. 99, no. 9, p. 3381-3388 How to cite?
Journal: Bioresource technology 
Abstract: In this study, filamentous bacteria (Nocardia amarae) were identified as the major causal microorganism in foaming sludge. The results of growth kinetics study indicated that N. amarae had a relatively strong affinity for non-readily biodegradable fatty acids. N. amarae was able to consume various fatty acids at a constant growth yield from 0.413 to 0.487 g/gCOD. Under common F/M ratio (less than 0.5 gBOD/gMLSS/d) used in activated sludge processes, specific growth rate of N. amarae was found to be more significant than that of non-filamentous bacteria. Based on this feature, a novel technique feast-fast operation (FFO) was developed for the foaming control. The sludge volume index (SVI) rapidly decreased from 300 to 80 mL/g and further stabilized at about 70 mL/g and the system was free from stable foam, while the BOD removal efficiency was maintained above 95%. This control technology effectively suppressed the overgrowth of filaments and improved the settleability of activated sludge without adverse effects on the treatment performance and the process stability.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/11044
ISSN: 0960-8524
EISSN: 1873-2976
DOI: 10.1016/j.biortech.2007.08.012
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