Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/11041
Title: Reconstruction of shoulder function using a reflected long head biceps : a moment arm study
Authors: Tang, CY
Mak, AFT
Hung, LK
Wong, HS
Pacaldo, T
Keywords: Biomechanics
Brachial plexus injury
Reconstruction surgery
Shoulder
Tendon transfer
Issue Date: 2002
Publisher: Elsevier
Source: Journal of biomechanics, 2002, v. 35, no. 8, p. 1143-1147 How to cite?
Journal: Journal of biomechanics 
Abstract: A tendon transfer technique is proposed for the reconstruction of the paralyzed shoulders secondary to brachial plexus injury. This innovative technique does not require bone-to-bone or tendon to-bone fixation, and attempts to overcome other clinical limitations such as those due to insufficient length of donor muscle. The approach is referred to as the reflected long head biceps (RLHB) technique. The long head of biceps tendons is utilized as a bridging tendon graft. Two surgical alternatives, namely the through-deltoid (TD) pathway and the sub-deltoid (SD) pathway, were studied. The moment arms of the transferred tendons were assessed and reported. The TD technique yielded a larger moment than the SD technique. In the plane 30° anterior to the scapular plane, the average moment arms were 3.8cm TD and 3.0cm SD at zero elevation. Such differences tended to further widen with increasing elevation. At 80° elevation, the moment arms became 3.2cm TD and 1.2cm SD. The results supported the clinical feasibility of this RLHB tendon transfer approach.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/11041
ISSN: 0021-9290
DOI: 10.1016/S0021-9290(02)00059-3
Appears in Collections:Journal/Magazine Article

Access
View full-text via PolyU eLinks SFX Query
Show full item record

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

1
Last Week
0
Last month
0
Citations as of Aug 12, 2017

WEB OF SCIENCETM
Citations

1
Last Week
0
Last month
0
Citations as of Aug 12, 2017

Page view(s)

36
Last Week
1
Last month
Checked on Aug 13, 2017

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric



Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.