Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/10862
Title: Shaking table test of a 1:20 scale high-rise building with a transfer plate system
Authors: Li, CS
Lam, SSE 
Zhang, MZ
Wong, YL
Keywords: Buildings, high-rise
Concrete, reinforced
Earthquakes
Plates
Seismic effects
Shake table tests
Issue Date: 2006
Publisher: American Society of Civil Engineers
Source: Journal of structural engineering, 2006, v. 132, no. 11, 012611QST, p. 1732-1744 How to cite?
Journal: Journal of structural engineering 
Abstract: The reinforced concrete building considered in this study has 34 typical floors above a 2.7 m thick transfer plate and a three-level podium. The transfer plate is a reinforced concrete thick plate that transfers the loads from the walls at the typical floors to widely spaced columns in the three-level podium. A microconcrete model representing the high-rise building was constructed in 1:20 scale. Shaking table tests were conducted and the model was subjected to earthquake actions representing minor, moderate, major, and supermajor earthquakes for a region of moderate seismicity, with basic seismic intensity at the VIIth degree pursuant to GB50011-2001. Seismic performance was qualitatively assessed, and it is predicted that the prototype building will not collapse when subjected to major earthquakes. The majority of the damage and failure occurred at the story above the transfer plate. To minimize the damage, it is desirable to strengthen the walls between the 4th and 15th floors as well as reducing any change in stiffness within the transfer plate zone. Data obtained from the shaking table tests were analyzed. Spectral frequencies of the acceleration spectra estimated by the fast Fourier transform method and deformation measurements are good indicators on structural damage. Plots of acceleration against displacement would be useful in assessing the locations of structural damage. The use of the ratio of lateral stiffness to check the existence of a soft story may not be appropriate for high-rise buildings. However, story drift relates well with the degree of structural damage.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/10862
ISSN: 0733-9445
EISSN: 1943-541X
DOI: 10.1061/(ASCE)0733-9445(2006)132:11(1732)
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